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Regimen Information

For AC followed by Taxol, including Side Effects

AC followed by Taxol

Drugs in this Regimen:

For the treatment of Breast Cancer

How AC followed by Taxol chemotherapy is given and possible side effects.

AC followed by Taxol for the treatment of Breast Cancer

AC followed by Taxol is the acronym for a chemotherapy regimen used in the treatment of breast cancer

DRUGS IN THE AC FOLLOWED BY TAXOL REGIMEN

A

= Doxorubicin Hydrochloride (Adriamycin)

C

= Cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan)

T

= Taxol (paclitaxel)

Chemotherapy is often given as a combination of drugs. Combinations usually work better than single drugs because different drugs kill cancer cells in different ways.

MOST COMMON SIDE EFFECTS OF AC FOLLOWED BY TAXOL

  • Anemia

  • Infection

  • Nausea & Vomiting

  • Appetite Loss

  • Alopecia or Hair Loss

  • Neuropathy

For more information, see the 'Expert Resources' tab below.

Community Responses

Often, the most helpful information regarding treatment side effects comes not from clinical brochures, but rather from other patients like you. We've collected the most helpful community resources to help you prepare for the side effects and coping tips for your chemotherapy regimen.

What side effects did you experience while on this medication?

The following have been voted the 3 most helpful responses to this question.

I am a basket case. I’ve had my third A/C (one more to go) followed by Taxol for 12 weekly infusions. I did great after the first two infusions followed by the Neulasta shot that I gave myself. This third one has kicked my butt. Made me question my very being and if i can really do it. I am so depressed and down my lip is practically dragging. I’ve got a funny, fluttery feeling in my chest (like I’ve have 10 espressos!) and plainly feel like crap. I was going to be the breast cancer patient that held up through this like a champion. Wasn’t going to complain. People were going to be amazed by my resolve and inspiration to others. Well, you can forget that. I have cried more in the last two days than I have since my diagnosis two months ago. Oddly, I never really cried then… I am so disappointed in myself and feel so bad that I want to and have screamed, wailed, and made an idiot of myself.

I have a real “following” on Facebook and feel like I can’t disappoint my “fans.” I’m ready to tell the docs, my family, and my dear, dear husband to screw the next A/C and all the rest of the Taxol. Sometimes I wish I’d never found my lump (diagnostic mammo couldn’t either!) and was living my old, ignorant but pain-free life.

Sorry to be such a Debbie Downer. I just really needed to vent my TRUE feelings.

  • Thu Dec 6, 2012
Hi, I'm heathert

I’ve just concluded my fourth (and, thankfully, final) two-week cycle of Adriamycin/Cytoxin; in a week, I begin 4 biweekly Taxol treatments. All this precedes the surgery and radiation that I will be having in the coming months. My oncologist and associated doctors (surgeon and radiation oncologist) have agreed that I’ve been fortunate with side effects to date — exhaustion, nausea (but no vomiting), minor bone pain (probably from the Neulasta shot that I get following each chemo infusion), heat flashes and extreme constipation the first week of each cycle, followed by the sense that I am gradually climbing out of a hole. But at least I have been able to live a more normal life by the end of the second week. By the way, I started losing my hair the day after Christmas — the day I started my second cycle with A/C — and counted myself fortunate that I was able to have hair for the Christmas holiday.

I have watched my diet — particularly the first week of each cycle — very carefully, and stick largely to roasted fish and/or chicken, lots of vegetables, Greek yogurt (a great alternative source of protein!) and a minimum of easy-to-absorb starches. I avoid fats, spice, acids and alcohol like the plague. Ginger tea (which you can find at World Market) sweetened with a touch of honey is a great natural way of keeping nausea under control. Of the countertop of meds that my doctor gave me to deal with side effects, she has told me that the only “must take” is Zantac; as a result, after reading the list of possible side effects from each of the side-effect meds (which in many cases seem to be even worse than the chemo side-effects they are supposed to address), I work to stop taking all except Zantac by the fourth or fifth day of each cycle. Finally, I have opted to walk three to five miles daily (three miles/day the first week, and five miles/day the second week). Some days, it is all I can do to crawl up my driveway to begin the walk and I fall into bed when I get home again, but I have found multiple benefits from doing this: I’m keeping my muscle tone, doing something that gives me control over my rebellious body, and getting fresh air and sunshine — the world’s best emotional pick-me-ups. (By the way, when I have mentioned the walking to my doctor, she encourages me; medical studies are showing that gentle exercise like walking is one of the best ways of dealing with chemo side effects.) Support from family, friends and neighbors, and nea

  • Wed Jan 30, 2013
I'm Melissa and I'm a 4 yr. Triple Negative Breast Cancer Survivor

CHEMOTHERAPY
I had Chemo treatments (2½ hour sessions) every other week for 16 weeks,with three visits to the hospital for blood work, Chemo, then I go back the following day to get a shot of Neulasta to bring my white blood cell back up. First set of Chemo was an intense cocktail chemotherapy, Adriamycin and Cytoxan known as the “Red Devil” that was very potent but for the most part I did very well – nausea controlled by meds, tingling and numbness in hands, some upset stomach, back pain, lost of appetite and food tasting bland and red blood cell count decreasing. The Chemo had thrown me into early menopause with hot flashes and night sweats.

I remember telling my husband about a week after my first Chemo treatment of how wicked it was. I felt like I had a bad hangover 24/7. Told him that I can’t do this, this is awful and that the cancer is going to come back again so what’s the point. I had to find that inner strength in me again to just do it, focus on 1 day at a time
My scalp became sore and tingled as I started losing hair about 3 days after my 2nd chemo treatment, going from shedding to rapidly falling out in clumps just by running my fingers through my hair. I never wore a wig, just my bandanas and fleece hats to keep my head warm.

The 2nd set of chemo, Taxol was a little easier on me – no nausea but the tradeoff was that it made me extremely tired, my bones in my legs ached all the time and these chemo sessions were now about 6 hours long!
I managed to keep my eyebrows and lashes until my last chemo treatment. I’ve lost most of my muscle tone, fingernails turned yellowish-orange, I’ve lost a few toe nails that turned black and peeled off. I developed this clicking noise in my ears. My hair came back in white like chick feathers and then turned curly salt and pepper look.

Melissa Paskvan
3 yr. Triple Negative Breast Cancer Survivor

  • Thu Nov 8, 2012
Hi, I'm Karen Harding

I’m ON taxol now. I came here for support. I’ve got 4 infusions to go & lost a cohort to death of all over body cancer, & now just not the brave strong courageous positive person I was for the first 16 weeks worth. :(

  • Thu Nov 29, 2012
I'm Miriam W. and I'm in treatment for Stage 2 Triple Negative Breast Cancer

The A/C chemo combination is rough, but taxol is worse! Pain will be your constant companion. HOWEVER! YOU CAN DO IT! The main thing to remember is that it will not be forever! No one promised that this would be easy, so if you think of yourself as a warrior in battle, you can be victorious! Following my first round of chemo, I caught viral meningitis(8 days in hospital )! Following my last round of chemo, I caught another virus (6days in hospital )! I had a mastectomy on my right breast and a reduction and lift on my left. I am currently in radiation treatment.
EVERY STAGE has challenges. Often I want to (and sometimes do) scream from outrage at this assault upon my body and my life . . .and then it hits me . . .it is about SAVING MY LIFE and I realize that I can handle all of it.

  • Sat Dec 1, 2012

I am a basket case. I’ve had my third A/C (one more to go) followed by Taxol for 12 weekly infusions. I did great after the first two infusions followed by the Neulasta shot that I gave myself. This third one has kicked my butt. Made me question my very being and if i can really do it. I am so depressed and down my lip is practically dragging. I’ve got a funny, fluttery feeling in my chest (like I’ve have 10 espressos!) and plainly feel like crap. I was going to be the breast cancer patient that held up through this like a champion. Wasn’t going to complain. People were going to be amazed by my resolve and inspiration to others. Well, you can forget that. I have cried more in the last two days than I have since my diagnosis two months ago. Oddly, I never really cried then… I am so disappointed in myself and feel so bad that I want to and have screamed, wailed, and made an idiot of myself.

I have a real “following” on Facebook and feel like I can’t disappoint my “fans.” I’m ready to tell the docs, my family, and my dear, dear husband to screw the next A/C and all the rest of the Taxol. Sometimes I wish I’d never found my lump (diagnostic mammo couldn’t either!) and was living my old, ignorant but pain-free life.

Sorry to be such a Debbie Downer. I just really needed to vent my TRUE feelings.

  • Thu Dec 6, 2012
Hi, I'm Marie E. O.

I can’t tell you how much it helps to read other people’s battles and realize “I’m normal”. I had triple neg breast cancer (diagnosed in Feb 2012), surgery, chemo (yes the red devil and then taxol). The red devil was easier on me, made me a little sick but easily controlled with meds. I did feel like I had the flu ALL the time but when I starte on the taxol I didn’t think I would make it. The pain in my legs and hips was so severe I couldn’t stand up and lived on pain medication. I seemed to only get up to go have another treatment. I did 33 treatments of radiation which made me more tired than the chemo. I still have a lot of pain in my legs, but sometimes in my hips, and then my neck. I feel like a chronic whiner, I always have pain but it moves around. I am still tired a lot and have to take naps and I’m not sure if thats normal or not. I finished treatments in Aug 2012. Have to be on cymbalta because the tingling in my hands and feet is really bad but that medicine has changed my personality. I know I react different to situations but can’t seem to stop myself. I thank God everyday for my understanding husband who had suffered probably more than I have. Ok, I feel better….it helps to vent to people who can understand and not just think I’m whining! Thank you

  • Sun Jan 6, 2013
Hi, I'm heathert

I’ve just concluded my fourth (and, thankfully, final) two-week cycle of Adriamycin/Cytoxin; in a week, I begin 4 biweekly Taxol treatments. All this precedes the surgery and radiation that I will be having in the coming months. My oncologist and associated doctors (surgeon and radiation oncologist) have agreed that I’ve been fortunate with side effects to date — exhaustion, nausea (but no vomiting), minor bone pain (probably from the Neulasta shot that I get following each chemo infusion), heat flashes and extreme constipation the first week of each cycle, followed by the sense that I am gradually climbing out of a hole. But at least I have been able to live a more normal life by the end of the second week. By the way, I started losing my hair the day after Christmas — the day I started my second cycle with A/C — and counted myself fortunate that I was able to have hair for the Christmas holiday.

I have watched my diet — particularly the first week of each cycle — very carefully, and stick largely to roasted fish and/or chicken, lots of vegetables, Greek yogurt (a great alternative source of protein!) and a minimum of easy-to-absorb starches. I avoid fats, spice, acids and alcohol like the plague. Ginger tea (which you can find at World Market) sweetened with a touch of honey is a great natural way of keeping nausea under control. Of the countertop of meds that my doctor gave me to deal with side effects, she has told me that the only “must take” is Zantac; as a result, after reading the list of possible side effects from each of the side-effect meds (which in many cases seem to be even worse than the chemo side-effects they are supposed to address), I work to stop taking all except Zantac by the fourth or fifth day of each cycle. Finally, I have opted to walk three to five miles daily (three miles/day the first week, and five miles/day the second week). Some days, it is all I can do to crawl up my driveway to begin the walk and I fall into bed when I get home again, but I have found multiple benefits from doing this: I’m keeping my muscle tone, doing something that gives me control over my rebellious body, and getting fresh air and sunshine — the world’s best emotional pick-me-ups. (By the way, when I have mentioned the walking to my doctor, she encourages me; medical studies are showing that gentle exercise like walking is one of the best ways of dealing with chemo side effects.) Support from family, friends and neighbors, and nea

  • Wed Jan 30, 2013
I'm Joanne, and I'm going to beat this!!

It’s funny how we are all so different. I did great through my 4 A/C treatments, and I was Miss Positive, but now that I have just finished my third Taxol, it’s killing me and I’m so ready to give up. I ache and I’m so sore, basically from head to toe. BUT giving up is not an option, and with the support from my amazing husband, family and friends, I will push on!!! Best of Luck to everyone out there going through this. We are all survivors!!!

  • Sat Feb 2, 2013
I'm Joanne, and I'm going to beat this!!

It’s funny how we are all so different. I did great through my 4 A/C treatments, and I was Miss Positive, but now that I have just finished my third Taxol, it’s killing me and I’m so ready to give up. I ache and I’m so sore, basically from head to toe. BUT giving up is not an option, and with the support from my amazing husband, family and friends, I will push on!!! Best of Luck to everyone out there going through this. We are all survivors!!!

  • Sat Feb 2, 2013

The AC chemo was Hell for me; it was followed by the Neulasta shot and I also took phenergan and Zofran on a regular basis for a few days afterwards so I’m not sure which one gave me these side effects: EXTREME fatigue, sleepiness, aching like I had the worst flu ever, constipation (from the Zofran I think). Sleep was my best friend.

It also put me into menopause; I am 50 so I was right on the edge anyway. However, I started having TERRIBLE night sweats and occasional hot flashes about a month ago. Sleeping through the night is not an option any more.

I have now completed five taxol infusions – my sixth out of 12 is tomorrow. I must say, this has been a breeze. You can read of my woes of the Red Devil in my previous post. Taxol has not been any issue thus far. I have been snowboarding twice and started a clogging class yesterday. The docs told me that this type of chemo was cumulative and I think I can feel the fatigue building. I’m going to dance while I can… :D

  • Tue Feb 12, 2013
Hi, I'm DrPhyl

I was able to do 3 of my 4 planned AC treatments but heart arrhythmia and a- fibs caused my doctors to cancel the 4th AC round and start my 12 weekly taxol treatments early. So far I’ve had 2 of the 12 and only feel tired and achy. I will have a few weeks between the Taxol and radiation. I am hopeful that this will take care of my stage II diagnosis.

  • Tue Mar 26, 2013
Hi, I'm Jennifer

With my AC treatments I only got sick at my stomach with the first 2 but it was no where near as bad as I thought it would be. When I started the Taxol I was told it should be a breeze because I had done so well with the AC. The first couple of treatments were easy but as they accumulated my joints started hurting. Then my fingers and toes started going number around the 5th treatment. After my 7th my fingernails felt as if they were about to fall off. They hurt me so bad I couldn’t do hardly anything with my hands. So the doctor gave me a 2 week break. I went back last Friday for my 8th treatment and my joints are already hurting again… I only have 4 more to go… Hoping they go by quickly….

  • Sun May 5, 2013
Hi, I'm Carol

Any one experience a splitting headache, after first ACT dense dose treatment for breast cancer?

  • Wed Aug 21, 2013
Hi, I'm Melissa S T.

I think my horrible mood is caused by the dexamethasone that they give with ac ct followed by nuelSta. I was a basket case going in for that shot and I too was put in my place. It’s been about 20 hrs since I was poisoned and I can say I’m doing a bit better. I felt like an science experiment and now know I’m not alone. We will get through this even when we just don’t. Keep the faith. Trip – missy

  • Fri Aug 22, 2014
Hi, I'm Sandra D K.

I had my third round of AC yesterday. The best way I could describe my symptoms is pregnancy on steroids. My stomach is always in a knot-feeling nauseated. I’ve always hated taking medications so It was hard to say take the nausea pills. I’d rather do that than feel sick. I’m constipated. I drink lots of water, eat prunes and just added a fiber cereal. My hair came out in clumps after round 2. Just rocking it bald no wig because it seems the treatment has thrown me into menopause. Hot flashes made me rip that wig off. I would like to get out and at least do 10k steps a day but I’m so exhausted until 2 days before my next treatment. I’m still trying to work full time so that I can get a check when I have to be out at length for surgery. This is all driving me crazy.

  • Fri Sep 18, 2015
I'm ALICE XXXXX, and I'm a survivor of Stage 4-Inflammatory Breast Cancer

I have stage 4 breast inflammatory breast cancer. I have just finished 4 rounds of AC. The 1st round was a walk in the park. The 2nd was good. I agree – the 3rd threw me for a six. It was very difficult to get through. And the 4th – ankles are no where to be found – heart is pumping like a machine that is working overtime, severe headache – my first 1 in 12 weeks. The only med I took during the 12 week period was nausea meds. I ate fibre cereal / oats every day – topped with flaxseed 3 days prior to chemo and 5 days after. I otherwise ate without flaxseed. I have dropped animal fat / butter / cow milk basically most dairy products from my diet. Still have the odd sour cream – I want some enjoyment from food. And yes food tastes bland :( more so after the 4th round. I always have water on hand – I don’t leave home without it. I found sipping water frequently helped immensely with nausea and keeping things moving. Have for the most part gone off tea / coffee. Live by the bicarb soda – it helps with mouth soreness a 100%. Have moments of feeling hot – hat off – and the cold – hat on. Lost all my hair – just rocking it bald – don’t like the wig or cancer hats – they gave my headaches. Found a beanie like nanna’s is great for home – ok it doesn’t look great – but does it matter. Family don’t care what you look like – they just want you there! Going out a found s lovely soft angora hat – $35.00 – less than what I paid for the cancer hat. My mental state travels between depression and not quite normal. I have to take Frmara as well as the chemo. Side effect of Gemara is menopause + depression – Great!! All up I can say THANK God I have my AC rounds. I am about to embark on my 12 week every week cycle of Taxol. OMG I am not looking forward to that after reading all the comments made. My onc informed me it’s easier than AC. I am not convinced. I believe they go by statistics – just whose I am not sure????

I can say AC was doable.
If I got through – you can too!!!!

I don’t for drugs either – always let the body heal itself
- well up until 12 weeks ago. Now I know why I don’t do drugs.

Good luck peeps – WE CAN DO IT!
So we start as

  • Fri Sep 18, 2015
I'm mariajeme, and I'm a survivor of Stage 2 Breast Cancer

Hi everybody,
I have been receiving AC treatments plus Neulasta for 2 months now. Next week I will start Taxol. After that I will have a mastectomy or a lumpectomy plus radiation. The AC treatments have been manageable. I went to Florida 3 days after the 1st treatment. This is a trip that my husband and I had planned before the diagnoses. One woman in my therapy group suggested that I that I ate white bread and drank ginger ale during the flights, and nothing else. I followed her advise and helped me a lot. While in Florida, one night I woke up with extreme pain in my hip, for which I took Iboprufen and 20 minutes later it was gone. The following day I rested, and read my book, on and off.
But I was able to swim in the pool for a couple of times during the week there.
However, the upset stomach has been a constant companion. I have taken the meds for it only occasionally. I have been able to soothe my stomach with black tea, ginger ale or Kefir (liquid yogurt), also by trying to calm myself down, and standing up and walking around…. who knew! And oh yes, it is difficult for me to “drink water”. The water turns up my stomach so I drink juices, ginger ale and green or black tea.
I have tried to do my normal activities, which include exercising. I bike ride, go to the Gym for Spinning classes and take walks. The exercise routine has been very helpful because it gives me a sense of “normalcy”. This is something that I normally would do with my husband. We belong to a cycling group where nobody knows about my Cancer. However, we now go with the slower group, I can’t keep up, I tire easily and have to take breaks…
I also attend a weekly therapy group for women with Cancer at the Hospital where I am being treated. It has been a great source of information and support. Sometimes you just need the direct support of someone that is going thru the same thing as you are! And there are a lot of us
The attention and care that I am receiving from family and friends has also be of great help. Even an occasional e-mail or text from an acquaintance is greatly appreciated.
I have told a lot of people that I have Cancer. And friends and family have been very supportive. I even went back to church. Praying at night has also been helpful.

Thank you all for your comments, I feel that I am not alone. This is about saving our life!!!.
You will survive…. stay the course.

  • Sun Jun 12, 2016
I'm JennyS, and I'm a survivor of Stage 3c Breast Cancer

I love the comments, it’s good to not feel alone. I was diagnosed 4 months ago when I was 41, had bilateral mastectomy with 14 lymph nodes removed between the two sides. So I have been on A/C – 3 rounds, with 1 to go then 12 rounds of Taxol. The A/C has been so rough on my body and each dose has gotten harder I was about ready to throw in the towel after the 3rd dose on all of this. Really! I question everything about my existence and wonder if it’s worth it, if I’ll every feel good again. Then right before the next dose I have a day or two that I feel ok. This time I’m not so they’re giving me another week to recover. First symptom that pushes me is I have a period/heavy vaginal bleeding for 8 days after and then a lighter period for the next week every time I get the A/C. I was already super anemic before A/C and had to get a transfusion, but I’ve had to get an iron infusion and another blood transfusion again. The second problem it causes in my stomach is really bad Gerd, so bad I can barely swallow my saliva let alone drink a lot of liquids so I have to go in and get liquids a couple of times (started with 1x and was 3x this last dose) within the week after chemo. The whole time I’m taking double doses of omemprozole, pepcid ac and zantac just to try and get it under control so I can eat and drink regularly. They also prescribed the mouth wash (horrible aftertaste) and carafate that increases the saliva production (be ready for stomach lurching) My tongue feels all cut up and I have mouth sores that get better little by little. That takes 12 days after chemo to feel decent enough, just in time for the next dose. Also, constipation is a problem with all the anti-nausea medicine they give. Then I think it’s the nulasta shot that causes such bad bones aches, head to toe (really, femur, skull, hips, you name it. So bad that the only think that kind of helps is a Norco, but I only take it at night just so I’m not loopy all day. I don’t sleep the first few days after chemo-maybe just a few hrs. But then my heart is racing and I’m up. I have a drippy nose and my eyes are super sensitive to light for that first week as well (sunglasses in the drs office even) Yes, I lost my hair, and am exhausted. They all tell me the next medicine isn’t as bad. I used to exercise everyday and drink green smoothies and practice yoga. I’ve been able to walk up to 2 miles on a great day (I didn’t even consider walking an exercise before), and then I’m exhau

  • Mon Sep 12, 2016
lar
lar
I'm lar, and I'm a survivor of Breast Cancer
lar

Last Monday I had the second treatment with AC and I have been so discouraged I too just want to quit the chemo. I had no problems having a mastectomy and I’m not bothered by the hair loss, but the constant nausea is discouraging. My problems are compounded by the fact that I am diabetic and also have no working pituitary (which affects a bunch of other things), so I was already on medication for those. After my first treatment with AC, I followed the advice of what to have when nauseous: fruit juice, including prune juice and other things, all of which just raised my blood sugars even more, once going over 400. My endocrinologist increased my diabetes medications. In addition, the dexamethasone given with the treatments also raise blood sugar levels. Day 8 after first treatment I fainted while trying to get ready to go for my blood tests, which we then postponed one day. The next day at the clinic I again felt light-headed and nauseous. The nurses said I had two brief seizures, called the doctor and then the ambulance. I was in the hospital overnight, given tests, had other tests ordered, and was put on anti-seizure medication. Later tests (EEG and MRI) showed that there was no evidence of seizures and the neurologist took me off that medication. Several doctors suggested the cause of the “seizures” may have been low blood sugar or low blood pressure. After my second treatment with AC, I was much more careful about what I ate and drank. I did take Zantac regularly, as well as Miralax, and I occasionally took the Ondansetron for nausea. In the evening of day five I got very hot and sweaty and felt horrible. We immediately tested my blood sugar and it was very low: 53, so we took counter measures. I had another instance of a level of 53 and took to checking my levels every two hours throughout the night, being afraid of it going too low during the night. This has only added stress and lessened sleep—for me and my husband. In addition, my white blood count has dropped drastically low after both treatments and I have been told not to go out. Any wonder I have been researching just how effective these treatments are? Only two more of AC sounds doable unless you are in the midst of it.

  • Wed Nov 9, 2016
I'm stoppeck10, and I'm a survivor of Stage 2 Breast Cancer

Hi….my name is Sharon. I will be starting the ACT treatment on 3/7. This is a recurrence of the breast cancer that I had a lumpectomy on 3/14/2014. I never made to the 3 years mark though. This time it a Stage 2 vs Stage 1 so they did a Mastectomy. I’m just wondering how bad is this regimen of chemotherapy? Last time only 8 treatments and I kept my hair. This time I realize it is going to be a lot different. Any thoughts, suggestions, anything would help….thanks. Sharon

  • Sat Feb 11, 2017
I'm stoppeck10, and I'm a survivor of Stage 2 Breast Cancer

Hi….my name is Sharon. I will be starting the ACT treatment on 3/7. This is a recurrence of the breast cancer that I had a lumpectomy on 3/14/2014. I never made to the 3 years mark though. This time it a Stage 2 vs Stage 1 so they did a Mastectomy. I’m just wondering how bad is this regimen of chemotherapy? Last time only 8 treatments and I kept my hair. This time I realize it is going to be a lot different. Any thoughts, suggestions, anything would help….thanks. Sharon

  • Sat Feb 11, 2017

This discussion needs your voice!

What were the specific side effects that you experienced while taking this medication? How did you manage them?

What coping tips would you give to new patients on this regimen?

I'm mominNC, and I'm a survivor of Breast Cancer

I was given advice to get the Sancuso patch to help avoid nausea. It is expensive and may not be covered by your insurance, but mine did cover with only $20 co pay for 4 a month ( I should only need 2 if I go every 2 weeks with the A/C, don’t know if I will need for Taxol) I have been through one treatment of A/C with the patch and I had very little nausea. I have only taken compazine twice. Speak to your physician because they also had prescribed me Zofran, which I was told once I got the patch cannot be taken together. I am sure the patch really helped.

  • Fri Apr 13, 2018

This discussion needs your voice!

What do you wish you had known before taking this medication? What information would you like to pass on to patients who are beginning this medication?

Treatment Overview

This chemotherapy regimen is commonly used to treat:

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