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The Rear Problem

I'm SydneyK2, and I'm a survivor of Stage 4 Colon Cancer

Hello to all! I am 26 years old and was diagnosed on December 18th 2015, with stage 4 Colon Cancer. I took Chemotherapy for about a year and decided it was time to stop. However, I am not giving up. Recently I have changed up my diet and have been doing better about exercising. I have felt more like a normal human being now than I have when I was on chemo. I am not religious, never have been. I will not discriminate against you if you are.
I have gotten passed the mad and depressed stages. Although, I do find myself a little down once in a while, but who hasn’t? I have learned to except the fact that I have cancer and am living with it.
Anyways. Where are my Colon cancer buddies at!? People who have a different diagnosis are more then welcome to join in the conversation. =-)

  • Post #1
  • Wed Feb 22, 2017
Hi, I'm Tina

Hi there! I was diagnosed stage 3 colon cancer January 2016, did 6 months on chemo and am now on the “scan every six months” plan. The first post chemo scan was earlier this month (Feb 2017) and a curious spot was detected at the former tumor site/reconnection point of the small and large intestine. So not bad news but guarded news. We’ll see if there are any changes in 6 months and go from there. I was 50 years old when I was diagnosed. I have no family history of cancer, not a smoker and had no other risk factors. Just a polyp that went cuckoo 6 to 10 years ago. I have an excellent support system in family and friends and cannot say enough good things about my team at Piedmont Atlanta!
I still get a jolt when I speak the words “colon cancer.” My brain is not convinced that any of this is real. In my heart of hearts I know that I got off light but don’t want to “jinx” it. My silly notions have to give way to logic but they still creep in, and that’s part of my process.

  • Post #2
  • Fri Feb 24, 2017
Hi, I'm Nancy S.

I was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer in September 2014.Have been on chemo for a little over 2 years.I had my first surgery in Oct 2014 which didn’t turn out to well.The doctor wasn’t able to remove all the cancer so the plan to start chemo was delayed I was left with an open wound and a couple of abscesses .In December I started my first treatment but by then I developed a blockage and my cancer moved to my spleen. Another surgery unsuccessful again they couldn’t remove the rest of the cancer so they just closed me back up. The prognosis didn’t look good, telling my family 3 to 6 months thats all I had. Surprise here I am 2 and a half years later. I am a religious person which helps me stay motivated. Im not on chemo anymore I just started Kaytruda it works with your immune system and so far I feel good. I receive treatment every 3 weeks and hopefully it is working.

  • Post #3
  • Fri Feb 24, 2017
I'm SydneyK2, and I'm a survivor of Stage 4 Colon Cancer

Hello Tina, Like you I have no sign of colon cancer in the family. However I do have breast cancer that runs in the family so I was kind of a mystery when I got colon instead. And no, you did not get off easy. Anyone dealing with cancer in any amount of time knows the struggles, pain, etc. I just wish you the best and many more good days without it!

Hello Nancy, two years is a long time. My father keeps asking me to return to chemo and I keep refusing. He doesn’t understand (reason why is because my markers are sky-rocketing and he’s scared) why I don’t just do chemo more. I tell him, that I would rather die than do more chemo. In my opinion that’s just no way to live. But I do understand that some people need it. I am glad that you feel good. You know, I do too. I feel great actually. And I wish you many many more days filled with great feelings and happiness. =-)

  • Post #4
  • Sat Feb 25, 2017
Hi, I'm Gary W.

I was first diagnosed with Stage 3 Colon Cancer when I was 49. Surgery to resect the Colon and 6 month of Chemo. During a routine follow up cat scan they found 2 new spots. One on the liver and another in my pelvis. After removing both of those plus a surprise resection of my colon again, on to 6 more months of Chemo. Here I am today 7 years later NED. Nine years since the first diagnosis. I understand the desire to just stop, I was there at times too. The fight is worth it. Try something new like Kaytruda. Try a clinical trial. Immunotherapy has come so far. Don’t give up.

  • Post #5
  • Sun Feb 26, 2017
Hi, I'm Semper73

I was diagnosed Stage 3 in 2011 with a mass at the junction of the ascending and transverse colon (wife says she now has medical evidence of where my head’s been all these years). Had the right hemicolectomy and 12 rounds of FOLFOX and had a clean scan. It came back Stage 3 in 2013 at the anastomoses (I was told this was very rare), had another hemicolectomy, and 12 rounds of FOLFIRI and clean scan. Came back Stage 4 in 2014 in a mesenteric lymph node. Genetic Alteration study showed 17 pathways (I’m always an over-achiever) with no specific treatment except one which was noted that the patient “may not tolerate”. Had six rounds of FOLFOX -OX + Avastin and was expecting to find out how far it had spread (e.g.,estimate of how much time I had left) when to everyone’s surprise, the lymph node “resolved”. Continued to monitor things and in 2015 the lymph node flared up so had it removed and a hernia repaired. Have been NED since that September, 2015. In total, they have removed 2 feet of my colon so I have been trying to convince folks I’m not as full of s*it as I used to be .. but it’s not working.

Been through the highs and lows and the discussion about continuing chemo or not with my wife (super support). Luckily, we beat the odds (thanks to the power of positive attitude and prayer IMHO). Have since had similar discussions with many friends who have been diagnosed with cancer. No wrong answers. It’s up to you and you alone. CANCER WARRIORS UINITE!

  • Post #6
  • Sun Feb 26, 2017
Hi, I'm Lorraine

I’m recently diagosed too with rectal cancer. It’s taking so long to get through this. Having to wait for surgery until after chemo and radiation. Now they tell me I must have a colostomy and may need chemo after! Meanwhile, my husband and I lost jobs at the beginning of all this. I’m freaking out; ANXIOUS. I also have a lung carcinoid tumor. They don’t tell me stage of any of it. Depends if rectal lymph nodes are positive. They were slightly enlarged. I need some miracles or something.

  • Post #7
  • Sun Feb 26, 2017
Hi, I'm Diane

Hello all, thank you for sharing your personal journeys, I appreciate this group as I have been feeling a bit isolated with my diagnosis since my circle of people are not in my boat, I appreciate this group as I already feel connected and a part of something that within me I feel I need to share and be understood from all of your personal perspectives.
I am just diagnosed Dec 14, 2016 – stage 3 colorectal cancer – I qualified for a clinical trial, FOLFOX chemo, 6 cycles then sizing, and surgery if 20% reduction results. I am in stride with all of this after the shock and shift in life happened inevitably.
I believe in the power of positive energy (guides that resonate with me like Ekhart Tolle, Pema Chodron, etc..), I look toward meditation, yoga, spiritual guidance, talking with friends who are in alignment with me and strive to have a positive life too – not letting myself get caught up in chaos and negative vibes. I know it is not possible to isolate from the messages and vibes of the world around me, and I do know that I have a choice to connect to the type of vibes that come my way, and this is my work. Bringing in the power of positive energy is my focus, as well as changing my eating behavior, what I put into my body.
I have looked into the Ketogenic diet on all angles, talking with doctors, looked up much research and know that it does not hurt to look to this way of eating as adjuvant to my chemo treatment plan. Before I started chemo I got on board with a functional medicine doctor, started acupuncture twice a week and started a gluten free, dairy free diet then added this ketogenic diet. I have never felt better….then I went into chemo, and am riding the moderate nausea, loose bowel wave (just showed up this second cycle of chemo)…I am taking many supplements, including chinese medicine, that do not interfere with the chemo, the pharmacist checked it all out and gave a thumbs up. My first two weeks of chemo did not show many side effects like they told me would show up – I know they give you the intense potential of what may happen when I had my initial appt with the Oncologist before my first chemo cycle. During and after the first cycle I did not have many of the side effects that they described would happen and at the intensity that they would show up.
I am hopeful that the tumor is shedding, in fact I am seeing it shed. My Oncologist said this would happen…that was very optimistic!
I truly believe that nutrition, positive energy work (praying, meditation, yoga..), and holistic/alternative medicine could give me a great advantage of clearing this cancer from my body. This crisis has motivated me to look in these directions to work at serving my body, mind and spirit to their highest good, and I feel that anybody can do this. I am curious if anyone else on this site are actively using any alternative treatments adjuvant to their Oncologist’s prescribed treatment plan, please let me know, I feel this is an edge for me to get ahead of my cancer and clear my system as much as possible. I would love to hear any feedback or stories that relate to my plight…right now I am on the fifth day of my second cycle of chemo and it is a bit more intense. I do feel the intensity diminish when I have acupuncture treatment.
Thank you for hearing me, this is my first post on this site, hence the length, I got a bit excited to share with you all.

In Peace,
Diane

  • Post #8
  • Mon Feb 27, 2017
Hi, I'm Edmund J W.

Good morning. I am a 53 year old male. I had not had a physical in 30 years. My wife got on me and I had one and a colonoscopy last August. I had 9 polyps and one that was too big to get out. Surgery removed 7 inches of colon and that too big polyp. Stage 1 cancer. Whew! No chemo, but I go back every 3 months to get a blood test and will get another colonoscopy this summer. I hope and pray the bastard cancer doesn’t come back! I enjoy his blog site. I get it every Sunday and look forward to reading it. So many have cancer much worse than me and are so very positive. I take strength from it all.

Best of luck!

Ed

  • Post #9
  • Sun Mar 5, 2017
Hi, I'm Liesel I H.

I was diagnosed with stage 2 rectal cancer at age 51 in 2006. I had 6 weeks of chemo (zeloda) radiation, surgery that removed my anus, rectum, part of my colon and a complete hysterectomy. I do have a permanent colostomy. Yes, you can live with it and if anyone has questions about that let me know. I also had Fulfox 6 chemo after surgery. I passed all my scans for years, my markers were never up, and I thought I was in the clear. In July 2016 a horrible bout of vertigo landed me in the emergency room. An MRI and CT scan later revealed tumors in my brain and lung. The doctors were sure it was a new primary cancer, but it turned out to be mets, now stage 4. I had brain surgery, gamma knife radiation to the brain and targeted radiation to the lung. Next week is follow MRI and CT scan to see how things are doing. And time for my every 3 year colonoscopy. We can all do this, we are all stronger than we thought we were, and deciding no more chemo takes great strength. Better to live well rather than to live long only to breathe. One day at a time!

  • Post #10
  • Mon Mar 6, 2017

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